Case studies

Innovation in local government is about improving the lives of the people in our communities. Browse through our case studies to see the many innovative programmes councils are involved in.

If you have a case study you'd like to share here, please get in touch. Please use our case study template when submitting a case study.

COVID-19 case studies

Councils are doing remarkable work to address the challenges brought by coronavirus. Good council practice related to the COVID-19 outbreak can be found on our dedicated web hub.

Filter by topics
Filter by support type
Your search returned 30 results

Community-based mental health and suicide prevention interventions for men – learnings and evidence from Cheshire and Merseyside

Like many areas, reaching and engaging middle aged men in suicide prevention activities is an important objective for the Champs Public Health Collaborative. The Collaborative commissioned Everton in the Community and Edge Hill University to conduct an evaluation of funded projects and a rapid evidence review of the effectiveness of these interventions. This case study was done jointly with the National Suicide Prevention Alliance and forms part of our suicide prevention resource.

Hertfordshire County Council and Stevenage Borough Council: A new crisis café to prevent suicide at a high-risk location

From March to October 2021, there was a reported increased in the number of suicide attempts, fatalities, and interventions at Stevenage train station. A Task and Finish Group was set up to quickly explore what support could be offered locally to people in crisis at the station. A NightLight crisis café has been opened close to the station, with 108 visits in the first month alone. This case study was done jointly with the National Suicide Prevention Alliance and forms part of our suicide prevention resource.

Kent and Medway: Highlighting the relationship between domestic abuse and suicide

The Kent and Medway Suicide Prevention (SP) team have been conducting unique research into the links between domestic abuse (DA) and suicide since 2019. Using Real Time Suicide Surveillance (RTSS) data supplied by Kent Police, our research has shown that approximately 30 per cent of all suspected suicides in Kent and Medway between January 2019 and January 2022 have been impacted by domestic abuse (either as a victim, perpetrator or as a young person. affected by the abuse). This case study was done jointly with the National Suicide Prevention Alliance and forms part of our suicide prevention resource.

Devon County Council - Access to means: Devon Bridges

Using engineering and designing infrastructure as way to prevent suicide. This case study was done jointly with the National Suicide Prevention Alliance and forms part of our suicide prevention resource.

Cambridge: how a café is helping people to recover from substance misuse

The Edge Café in Cambridge provides support to people recovering from substance misuse and those with mental health problems by running recovery groups and providing opportunities for volunteering.

Newcastle: providing drug and alcohol rehab from a library

An element of drug and alcohol recovery support has been run from a community library since 2019 in Newcastle.

Suffolk: providing wellbeing support from libraries

Libraries in Suffolk provide a comprehensive range of mental health and wellbeing help situated in the hearts of towns and villages across the county. 

Camden: inspiring transitional care for young people

Camden has developed Minding the Gap, delivered by a partnership between the council, the CCG and the voluntary sector, to improve the mental health of young people aged 16-24.

Oxfordshire: voluntary and community sector response to transition

Response are the largest third sector provider of mental health and wellbeing services tailored to young people in Oxfordshire. In partnership with six voluntary and community sector providers, Response came together to develop the Mental Wealth Academy.

East Sussex: fighting mental health stigma at the front door

East Sussex County Council consists of coastal areas with multiple deprivations (despite the county overall being relatively affluent) and there is also fluctuation in the demand for mental health services.